21 Aug 2013

His back pages

Another riff on Milton Glaser’s indefatigable Dylan poster, here for a book by Roots drummer Questlove. It’s interesting the jacket designer also uses a Baby Teeth-esque typeface (though it looks a little wonky?). Anyway, some amusing stories have been bubbling up from this particular volume, including (on Slate) The Time I Went Roller Skating With Prince. Some of earlier, amusingly candid versions of these stories can also be found at the website Questlove’s Celebrity Stories.

14 Aug 2013

Emphasis on graphics

Henry Wolf’s photograph for a student architectural drawing competition.

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12 Jul 2013

Man in the shadows

Milton Glaser’s cover design for Wilfrid Sheed’s People Will Always Be Kind, Farrar, Straus & Giroux (1973)

Wilfrid Sheed, who died in 2011, was a sharp, flinty prose stylist too often overshadowed by his more explicitly experimental or social-commentary-oriented contemporaries. The acerbic flavor of his art may be best enjoyed in Max Jamison (1970). The next novel, People Will Always Be Kind (named after a line in a Siegfried Sassoon poem) was less heralded but continued to refine his style and adapt it to the world around him (somewhat comparably to Saul Bellow’s middle work). In Dwight Garner’s sensitive appreciation, he emphasizes Sheed’s biting essay style:

“Mushy reviews are a breach of faith,” he declared, and the skin on his compositions was salt-crusted. One review began: “Of Ezra Pound, as of Bobby Fischer, all that can decently be said is that his colleagues admire him.” Another began this way: “Scott Fitzgerald is a sound you like to hear at certain times of the day, say at four in the afternoon and again late at night, and at other times it makes you slightly sick.” Another stated: “Books about suicide make lousy gifts.”

He wanted to live in a world in which one could find “Gershwin playing all night in penthouses, while George Kaufman fired one-liners into the guests and Harpo scrambled eggs in their hats.” Milton Glaser’s cover, with its punchy color combined with austere but evocative line, seems neatly suited to such a world.

07 Jun 2013

I can’t see my flag anymore

Tony Palladino Collection, Slides. Photo by Edith Marshall. For Empathy Graphics.

This detail from an anti-Vietnam war poster is represented only on a slide in the Tony Palladino collection. In serif text above the image, the original includes the complaint “I can’t see my flag anymore”—which has some of the same arch plainness or indirection of Chwast’s anti-war End Bad Breath poster of two years prior. Here’s another of various flags by Palladino, one graphic symbol whose permutations he remained fascinated by throughout his career. Despite its relative lack of exposure today, it is one of two Palladino posters in the Library of Congress.

17 May 2013

Dusty and the Duke

Milton Glaser illustrates the stark contrast between two film stars of 1969 — Dustin Hoffman and John Wayne.

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26 Apr 2013

Guessing game

A mystery poster from the making of SVA Gold.

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10 Apr 2013

Push Pin & Pop

Some ephemeral points of comparison between the work of Seymour Chwast and Andy Warhol.

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20 Feb 2013

Cameo gallery

Seymour Chwast Collection: Series 5, Item E33. Photograph by Carl Fischer.

In 1995, the Cooper Union celebrated the 40th anniversary of Pushpin Studios with an exhibition and special sale of drawings and paintings by the three founders, pictured above: Seymour Chwast, Edward Sorel, and Milton Glaser; along with works by John Alcorn, Sam Antupit, Michael Aron, Vincent Ceci, Paul Davis, George Leavitt, Tim Lewis, Jim McMullan, Reynold Ruffins, Jerold Smokler, Richard Mantel, “and others.” This reminded me of another similar device that captured a group that is also heavily represented by the Archive.

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01 Feb 2013

Inaugural address

A pair of posters announcing the School of Visual Arts’ new location at 209 E 23rd Street.

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25 Jan 2013

More of that PBS guy

So last time we looked at a slide I’d happened upon by chance in the Push Pin slide library, for the font used in the PBS logo by Lubalin Studio. In the end of the post, I briefly mentioned that Chermayeff & Geismar updated the logo in 1984, taking the “P-head” from Lubalin’s logo…

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