All entries tagged ‘poster’
07 Jun 2013

I can’t see my flag anymore

Tony Palladino Collection, Slides. Photo by Edith Marshall. For Empathy Graphics.

This detail from an anti-Vietnam war poster is represented only on a slide in the Tony Palladino collection. In serif text above the image, the original includes the complaint “I can’t see my flag anymore”—which has some of the same arch plainness or indirection of Chwast’s anti-war End Bad Breath poster of two years prior. Here’s another of various flags by Palladino, one graphic symbol whose permutations he remained fascinated by throughout his career. Despite its relative lack of exposure today, it is one of two Palladino posters in the Library of Congress.

26 Apr 2013

Guessing game

A mystery poster from the making of SVA Gold.

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01 Feb 2013

Inaugural address

A pair of posters announcing the School of Visual Arts’ new location at 209 E 23rd Street.

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21 Nov 2012

Odd bird

Milton Glaser Collection. Drawer 21, Folder 11: poster for Poppy records, 1968.

Looks like a regular ocellated fellow, with one significant difference. Cross-reference for flowers sprouting from heads: Utopia Records, and this poster for Push Pin Graphic. (Typeface is Glaser Stencil, which appeared on other Poppy productions as well.)

18 Oct 2012

Fifty-seven varieties of Heinz

Heinz Edelmann Collection. Series 2, Item 71. Poster for WDR, 23.5 × 33.5.

Heinz Edelmann, like his contemporary Milton Glaser, had an incredible range of graphic styles, both in his mode of illustration and layout. This 1982 poster for the Westdeutscher Rundfunk broadcaster’s series Reden muß man miteinander (roughly—correct me if I’m wrong—“We need to talk”) enlists an exceptional array of devices recalling the work of Seymour Chwast: there are similarities in the pattern, abstracted period stylization, and a floating quality to the shapes and forms, though imbued here with Edelmann’s more spastic bursts of emphasis. For comparison, see this Chwastian cat or this notable cover of Pushpin Graphic. Click through for the full poster.

18 Jul 2012

Here comes the bride

In honor of summer wedding season we bring you Tony Palladino’s poster for “The Wedding Party.”

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26 Jun 2012

Sunday hats

Tony Palladino created this indelible image for an SVA poster in 1989.

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06 Jun 2012

Crowd control

Tony Palladino, along with Chermayeff & Geismar, was enlisted by Mobil to design the poster for Cotton Bowl advertisements in the late-80s and 90s. We don’t actually have this poster in our collection, though we have two others (which will follow shortly); only this slide of it. The others also make use of the visual appearance of a crowd as a way to play with perception of figure and ground. This slide didn’t go through properly the first time so I don’t have a good image of it, but if you click through I’ve included a smaller picture for reference.

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27 Apr 2012

Some more tearing

From the George Tscherny Collection, Series 4.

Promotion by George Tscherny for Strathmore paper, 1958. Torn-paper motifs seemed to have been very much the thing for that year (when Tony Palladino contributed this one). Click through for the full image.

15 Feb 2012

Phil Hays for SVA

This is a detail from possibly my all-time favorite SVA poster (click through for the whole image). It was illustrated by Phil Hays in the 1960s while he was chairman of SVA’s illustration department. Hays’ later work, especially his portraits of musicians and Hollywood stars, was markedly more hyperrealistic and decadent than this simple three-pane poster of a woman sitting in a chair, smoking. At first it seems something of a strange ad pitch, yet the subject is serene and satisfied and the work is masterly, somehow making the argument for SVA in its inherent quality.

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13 Jan 2012

Brushes with history

Detail from SVA Collection, Events: Fine Arts Department. ‘Artist and Critic: The Nature of the Relationship’ (March 1979).

Another example of paintbrushes (standing in for the artist) combined with another object (here, amid or as the hammers on a typewriter) follows the one we featured last week. The poster this detail is from originally was made to promote a panel discussion between the artists Alice Aycock, Alex Katz, and Lucio Pozzi with critics Lawrence Alloway, Hilton Kramer and moderator Donald Kuspit on the relationship between the artist and critic.

06 Sep 2011

Bob + Joan

Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, 1964. Image courtesy of the SVA Picture Collection

Bob Dylan’s brief relationship with Joan Baez was exhaustively documented, but we get interested when that affair highlighted the work of Push Pin Studios. In 1964, Dylan and Baez were photographed at Newark Airport in front of Seymour Chwast’s poster for Booth’s Gin: an incongruous, but not surprising, image of two icons flanking a countercultural message from a corporate advertiser.

22 Jul 2011

Layer cake

One of the central features of the Push Pin generation of designers — mainly Seymour Chwast and Milton Glaser — was a continued inspiration from, and reliance upon, physically layered compositions (using e.g., cello-tak) and photographic compositing.

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03 Jun 2011

On the same wavelength

The BFA Fine Arts department has long shown film or video art in the SVA Amphitheatre. These rough posters, spanning three decades, announce screenings of milestone works.

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27 May 2011

Dirty talks

Panel discussions and talks sponsored by the Fine Arts Department in the heady conceptual late-70s and early-80s often adopted a DIY or punk aesthetic in their announcements.

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24 May 2011

Stop the presses

Milton Glaser Collection Box 68 Folder 17. Bird for UNICEF poster, late 1960s – early 1970s.

Container List is on Twitter! Follow us for new post alerts as well as anything else we find that we think may appeal to you, beloved readers.

17 May 2011

First Look: Gail Anderson

Next on deck in our Design and Illustration Study Collection is the work of designer and art director Gail Anderson.

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31 Mar 2011

McMullan at NYPL

Go see James McMullan’s Lincoln Center Theater posters at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

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13 Jan 2011

George Tscherny for Herman Miller

George Tscherny developed his style working for Herman Miller in the mid-50s.

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07 Jan 2011

Foot fetish

The transfigured shoes of Push Pin Studios.

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15 Oct 2010

Exploding coffee table

Milton Glaser Collection Drawer 18 Folder 18: Detail from Knoll Sottsass poster, 1982.

While we’re on the subject of the Memphis Group, better take cover; that table’s gonna blow.

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27 Sep 2010

Kid stuff

We looked at some of Edelmann’s political posters for the West German radio station WDR back in June. But there was also a lighter side to his collaboration with the broadcaster.

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21 Sep 2010

Go ask Alice

Milton Glaser Collection Box 65, Folder 1: Detail from poster for The Push Pin Graphic No. 52, 1967.

In 1967, Milton Glaser, Seymour Chwast, and James McMullan produced psychedelic “travel” posters for an issue of The Push Pin Graphic.

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09 Sep 2010

Turning point

More from George Tscherny: his design on the poster for the U.S. exhibition at the troubled Milan Triennale of 1968. In those days, the event served as a major convergence point for conversation and debate within the design community.

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03 Sep 2010

A new Penney

George Tscherny was one of the heraldic “here comes modernism” designers of the ’70s: along with Chermayeff & Geismar, his name seemed to be high on the shortlist when design became a hot item in the boardroom—though the bigwigs did not necessarily always follow through with a whole, or lasting, campaign.

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31 Aug 2010

Use your head

School of Visual Arts Collection. Detail of poster illustrated by Phil Hays and designed by Ivan Chermayeff, 1960s.

SVA’s early subway posters helped raise the school to a new plane of artistic and intellectual pursuits.

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16 Aug 2010

First Look: The Design of Dissent

We’ve just received materials from the 2005 exhibition The Design of Dissent donated by designer Mirko Ilić, who, along with Milton Glaser, collected the materials and created a book on the project.

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06 Aug 2010

Serial production

For large patches of his later career Heinz Edelmann focused on quickly producing posters for arts events and series productions: these typically made use of a fairly regularized typographic template for information, and wild, allusive but enigmatic illustrations. For one season in the mid-1980s, he worked with the Düsseldorfer Schauspielhaus theater, playing off the plays’ angsty plotlines with evocatively deformed bodies.

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16 Jul 2010

Milton Glaser’s geometries

Milton Glaser is closely associated with a visual style emphasizing expressive illustrations and resonant cultural symbols, but revisiting different periods in his career one is reminded that he was constantly developing new approaches, and in the Glaser Collection one can find an astonishingly wide range of approaches to design problems.

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02 Jul 2010

C&G for Masterpiece Theatre

Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Drawer 7, Folder 2. Mobil Masterpiece Theatre.

Masterpiece Theatre was the principal portal into British television for American audiences in the seventies; Mobil, the sponsor, drafted their longtime designers Chermayeff & Geismar to make posters for various features.

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28 Jun 2010

Robert Weaver at SVA

School of Visual Arts Collection: Poster for Robert Weaver: Retrospective 1956-1977.

Pioneering illustrator Robert Weaver was a major figure at SVA beginning in 1950s.

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23 Jun 2010

In the balance

WDR. Die Ausgewogenheit (3): Die Scharfe, Aber Erlaubte Kritik [The Balance: The Pointed, But Allowed, Critique]. n.d.

In the 1970s and 1980s Heinz Edelmann designed many posters for the West German public broadcasting station Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR).

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14 Jun 2010

Ring leaders

If Chermayeff & Geismar could be said to have one particular speciality, it would probably be the knack for distilling complex organizational systems into extremely reduced graphic ideas: their calling card in this respect was the Symbol Signs project. But this poster for Interactive Data Corporation, with its monochrome figuration for a symposium, also falls neatly into the category (along with work for Xerox). Click through for the full page.

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25 Feb 2010

American-Type Sculpture

Poster for the exhibition American-Type Sculpture, Part 2, which opened at the Visual Arts Gallery in 1973. Curator Phyllis Tuchman brought together a prophetic list of artists for the show, including Louise Bourgeois, Sol LeWitt, and Richard Serra.

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09 Feb 2010

Missed connections

Left: Cover of Hot Chip’s One Life Stand (Astralwerks). Right: Poster for The Crucible, by Arthur Miller (Düsseldorfer Schauspielhaus). Designed by Heinz Edelmann, 33 × 47 in. n. d.

You were the cute bearded guy on the F train this morning. I was the somewhat pallid but classically beautiful girl. I thought we were a good match but it was as though we were pulled apart by powerful ropes. Want to have coffee sometime?

07 Jan 2010

Bob Gill

School of Visual Arts Collection, Bob Gill self-promotional pamphlet, c. 1959.

Designer and illustrator Bob Gill was one of the earliest faculty members at SVA, joining right around the time George Tscherny taught the school’s first design course.

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16 Nov 2009

C&G for Howard Wise Gallery

Chermayeff & Geismar Collection Box 48 Folder 14: Milton Resnick exhibition at Howard Wise Gallery.

Chermayeff & Geismar designed a series of exhibition posters for the Howard Wise Gallery in the 1960s, highlighting the artists’ works. Wise exhibited abstract expressionists including Milton Resnick and Edward Dugmore, and later specialized in kinetic art and light sculputure.

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10 Nov 2009

The Mead Library of Ideas

In the 1970s, the Mead Library of Ideas held exhibitions showcasing the best contemporary graphic design; they commissioned announcement posters from designers including Tony Palladino, Chermayeff & Geismar, and Seymour Chwast.

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07 Oct 2009

First Look, part 3: George Tscherny

George Tscherny Collection: Get to the point! poster for W.R. Grace & Co., 1982.

We’re continuing to receive great stuff from George Tscherny, and here’s the latest.

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24 Sep 2009

Chermayeff & Geismar for Pan Am

Chermayeff & Geismar Collection: Drawer 9, Folder 15.

In 1971, Chermayeff & Geismar designed these posters for Pan Am, which are now featured in the latest issue of Eye magazine as part of the article Flight of the Imagination. In it, SVA Design Criticism student Frederico Duarte investigates this fruitful period in the company’s history:

Under the supervision of Patrick Friesner, Pan Am’s head of sales and promotion, Chermayeff & Geismar was one of a handful of studios taken on to produce, at a frenzied pace, promotional materials that carried the new identity; others included George Tscherny, Rudolph de Harak and, in London, Alan Fletcher.

We have written on Tscherny’s artwork and modular displays for Pan Am. And now we’ve also uploaded more of C&G’s posters in the series (in our Flickr).

09 Sep 2009

Edelmann’s design on a dime

Heinz Edelmann Collection: Folder 14 Item 93.

While preparing for a class visit a couple of weeks ago, I rediscovered these gorgeous posters Heinz Edelmann did for Theater der Welt (Theater of the World) in 1981.

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03 Sep 2009

George Tscherny’s brushwork

This detail for a 1956 poster for the Cartoonist & Illustrators School by George Tscherny. Rebranded as the School of Visual Arts later that year, the designer had a long and fruitful relationship with the institution.

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07 Aug 2009

Twen at the Visual Arts Gallery

SVA Collection, RG 15 Exhibitions

Milton Glaser designed this poster for an exhibition at the Visual Arts Gallery in late 1965. Twen, a West German magazine for “people in their twenties: from 15 to 30,” was wildly influential in design circles worldwide—with a grid system composed of twelve small modules combined in an internally regular but widely varying page layouts, and liberal full-bleed spreads photographed by Art Kane, Will McBride, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon and others (and illustrations by Heinz Edelmann). It introduced many design students to Willy Fleckhaus, the magazine’s art director and sometime editor, who became famous for his virtuosic combination of close-set typography and tightly-cropped images. The rigid geometry of this poster, though not usually associated with Glaser, was a mode he employed often for SVA exhibition posters (more can be seen here and here). Though the graphic austerity is a contrast to his earlier work, the underlying expression of concepts through tactile visual representation is, I think, unmistakable Glaser.

23 Jul 2009

Saying good-bye to Heinz Edelmann

Esteemed designer and illustrator Heinz Edelmann passed away on Tuesday. I had the great pleasure of getting to know him a little bit while coordinating his gift to the Glaser Archives. He quickly became one of my favorite people to chat with; despite his deteriorating health, he was always charming and extremely funny. His mordant sense of humor betrayed a clear frustration with the current state of the world. Above are a couple of pages from his 2008 holiday card.

I feel very sad, but also grateful that we’ll be able help keep his legacy alive through his amazing body of work.

Enjoy a few of the acclaimed posters he produced for Germany’s Westdeutscher Rundfunk radio station after the jump. And click here for a characteristically witty and illuminating interview with Edelmann in Graphis.

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20 Jul 2009

Inside the Big Apple

Milton Glaser Collection: Box 3, Folder 12

One of the main attractions of the archive as a research tool is as a document of artistic process. (The effect of the overwriting of drafts by computers is a subject I have written about elsewhere.) There were several stages to Milton Glaser’s development of a poster for the Visual Arts Gallery exhibition “Inside the Big Apple” (1968) — the above shows his collage of different versions of the figuration, which arrangement ended up contributing the composition that he used in the final version (other versions and the final poster follow).

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07 Jul 2009

Glaser for RCA Computers

Milton Glaser Collection: Drawer 20, Folders 10-12.

In 1970, Milton Glaser did a series of three posters for RCA’s Computer Division entitled Memory Unbound. They express the abstract promise of technology that was at least a decade away for most people.

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22 Jun 2009

Script pattern by Ivan Chermayeff

Ivan Chermayeff designed this poster for AIGA’s “Color” exhibition in 1974, which collected work by artists, photographers and designers. Tightly flowing script creates a pattern made out of textual gibberish, where exaggerated descenders are punctuated at intervals with large blobs of ink. Click through for the whole image, with Chermayeff’s colorful signature.

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17 Jun 2009

Sol LeWitt’s conceptual graphics

Detail from Sol Lewitt, All Combinations of Arcs from Four Corners, Arcs from Four Sides, Straight Lines, Not-Straight Lines and Broken Lines (1976).

In March 1976, Sol Lewitt had his first solo exhibition at the Visual Arts Museum (209 E. 23rd Street). The work exhibited wasn’t the piece itself, but rather the result of instructions he gave to third parties: they assembled a large graphic combination drawn from a vocabulary of white-on-black linear figures provided by the artist. Instead of hiring technicians or specialists to screen the shapes in a particular order, the artist made explicit that the idea or set of instructions for the art was itself the art, rather than the artifact it produced. He continued the process across several similar pieces, some of which used the same graphic forms — one, Wall Drawing #260, was the subject of a recent focus exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.

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05 May 2009

Mom always said…

Steven Heller Collection: Posters.

The best translation I can come up with is “Only so!” which could be completely wrong. In any case, surely the image in this poster from the World Health Organization speaks for itself.

07 Apr 2009

Tony Palladino’s Guide to Life

Tony Palladino Collection: Box 9, Folder 21.

Here’s a 1957 poster by Tony Palladino. Substitute ’09 for ’57 and it still works. Click here for the full image.

31 Mar 2009

The furniture people of Stanley VanDerBeek

Milton Glaser Collection: Box 112, Folder 24, Push Pin Graphic (undated)

Stan VanDerBeek (1927-1984) was best known as an experimental filmmaker but he was also a gifted painter and sculptor. This undated issue of the Push Pin Graphic features photographs of VanDerBeek’s whimsical creations.

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04 Feb 2009

First look: Heinz Edelmann Collection

Direct from Stuttgart, we’ve received 151 posters and 9 books from the truly delightful Heinz Edelmann. Edelmann is best known as the influential art director of The Beatles’ film, Yellow Submarine. He’s worked in Germany, England and the Netherlands since the late 1950s, doing design, illustration, advertising and animation.

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29 Jan 2009

For the love of Pee-Wee

Steven Heller Collection: Posters and Prints

Here’s a 1981 print from highly influential graphic artist (and longtime SVA instructor) Gary Panter advertising Paul Reubens’ Pee-Wee stage show in Los Angeles. The show was the springboard for Reubens’ feature film, Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, and later his acclaimed series, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse. Panter was the head set designer for the TV show and this early poster displays his trademark jagged lines and surreal sensibility. Now scream real loud when you hear the secret word…

16 Jan 2009

Inspiration: XTC and Milton Glaser

Milton Glaser Collection: Drawer 11, Folder 26

XTC’s Andy Partridge readily admits to using Milton Glaser’s 1966 poster for radio station WOR as the inspiration for the cover art for XTC’s 1989 album Oranges and Lemons (viewable here). He has also professed his love of the work of Yellow Submarine art director and designer Heinz Edelmann, who is also a new addition to the archives — sneak peek to come!