23 Aug

I See a Pattern

Milton Glaser. Brochure for Periphonics Corporation, 1971.

Designers working in both the modernist style and the more eclectic and illustrative approach of Push Pin Studios have consistently found ways to employ patterns. In some cases, repetition reflects the designers’ pleasure in the juxtaposition of colors and shapes and the optical illusions they create. In others, the patterns are part of a more complex conceptual whole, in which duplication expresses something specific about the client’s products or creates visual pun. These are some objects from our collections in which patterns, be they geometric shapes or type or drawings, serve as the foundational idea for the design.

Seymour Chwast. The Nose no. 12, 2005. Graphic illustrating Imelda Marcos’ excessive shoe collection.

James McMullan. Push Pin Graphic no. 50, 1966. Issue on neighborhoods.

Chermayeff & Geismar. Brochure for Museum of Modern Art mailer, 1964.

Chermayeff & Geismar. Brochure for Museum of Modern Art mailer, 1964.

Chermayeff & Geismar. Brochure for Museum of Modern Art mailer, 1964.

Chermayeff & Geismar. Brochure for Museum of Modern Art mailer, 1964.

George Tscherny. Holiday card for Overseas National Airways, 1968.

Roger Ferriter. Book jacket, c. 1960.

Tony Palladino. New Year’s mailer, 1957.

Chermayeff & Geismar. Uarco annual report, 1969.

Milton Glaser. Invitation to opening for exhibition at SVA’s Visual Arts Gallery, 1966.

Come visit in person to see the original materials on display in the SVA Library.